All posts tagged: Media

This startup wants you to be able to publish your blog from any device

Image: verst

If you’re planning to construct your brand name with some fresh material, your very first stop might be WordPress.com or Medium, or you might pick Wix (the favorite of part-Victoria Secret design, part-coder Karlie Kloss).

CEO AJ Frank would rather you select Verst to publish, handle, and monetize your words (from anywhere including your smart device) and truly comprehend your audience.

Just over a years of age, Verst introduced a number of brand-new functions Wednesday that consist of paid memberships, homepage styles, a less expensive rates tier, content migration from WordPress, and e-mail shipment.

Frank formerly worked as a senior item supervisor at Uber, the basic supervisor at Vine, and in brand-new organisation advancement at Google. He’s rather familiar with getting individuals online, specifically on their smart devices, to click, scroll, and watch.

While rival websites like WordPress, Medium, Wix, and personalized sites appear abundant, Frank stated he and his group saw a requirement for a data-empowered and mobile-focused service.

“We’re a totally included publishing platform, for experts, not simply enthusiasts. We desire you to own your audience the manner in which you wont on Facebook and utilize Verst as your main center,” Frank stated.

Image: verst

The newest upgrade lets blog writers put a few of their material behind a paywall, using a method to making loan beyond digital marketing likewise used on the website. Blog writers take 90 percent of the earnings.

Verst is less of a drag and drop experience like Wix and not simply a one-option just variation like Medium. Rather, rather like WordPress, users can select in between a handful of style alternatives which can then be quickly modified. Unlike WordPress, Verst is properly designed and has a mobile app for publishing.

“Our top [concern is] making it much easier to preserve a website and utilize,” Frank stated. “We have a mobile service, where we desire any publisher to be able to sweat off their phone or their tablet.”

Frank didn’t reveal the number of users they have however indicated some popular pages. Reid Hoffman, cofounder of LinkedIn, is a consultant to the business and runs his blog site with Verst. He shares some post to LinkedIn too. Political expert and activist Ian Capstick , YouTuber Chris Klemens , and psychological health app Stigma likewise utilize Verst.

What Verst cannot ensure, Frank stated, is developing you an audience.

While Medium has an integrated social media network element, Verst acts just as your landing page. It’s up to you to share the page throughout Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. When to publish, Verst does assist with search engine optimization to enhance your Google ranking and likewise offers other audience insights so you can be smarter about.

Of course, material hosting isn’t really totally free. Verst has actually been charging $29 each month for the entire experience however is likewise presenting a $12 each month tier.

Next up for Verst is using more ideas and insights. When would be an excellent time to publish and perhaps one day even post or share instantly, a mobile notice of the Verst app might recommend.

“We can be not just a location you can release and see analytics however likewise a coach for you. The more you release the simplest it is to construct an audience,” Frank stated.

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontThis startup wants you to be able to publish your blog from any device
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HuffPost shows off its slick new look

Image: huffpost

When speaking about the future of the Huffington Post brand name, editor-in-chief Lydia Polgreen indicates the homepage “splash” following the news that Bill O’Reilly had actually been released from Fox News.

“BILLY ON THE STREET” shrieked the heading in huge, red letters.

Image: mediaite

That’s a perceptiveness that Polgreen wishes to not simply broaden however keep. On Monday, the Huffington Post is presenting its most significant redesign ever and first-ever rebrand and its most significant relocation because the exit of cofounder and name Arianna Huffington.

And about that name function. The media business will now call itself HuffPost, and it’s got a brand-new logo design and site to accompany the brand-new name.

The brand-new site keeps the traditional “splash” homepage and three-column setup, however tidies up the top. It looks more like a modern-day site rather than the older style that Polgreen notes belonged to the website’s initial tribute to the papers it was created to mimic.

Image: HuffPost

Not just is the splash still there, prepare yourself to see it in other places.

“This is an enjoyable method for us to take exactly what we view as our voice and users view as our voice and take it off platform,” stated Julia Beizer, HuffPost‘s head of item.

The redesign comes a bit more than 8 months because Arianna Huffington left the publication that she began in 2005. Under her management, the site turned into a significant digital media location, winning a Pulitzer Prize and ultimately offering to AOL for $315 million in 2011.

Huffington’s reign wasn’t without its issues. The site had a hard time to make a profit (a concern that continues to pet digital media start-ups), while the business’s dependence on overdue blog writers and its internal culture dealt with a lot of reviews.

Now, HuffPost remains in the middle of a shift duration. The site, now technically owned by Verizon (after it purchased AOL), revealed in December the visit of Polgreen, then a well-respected veteran editor at the New York Times.

Since taking control of, Polgreen has actually become a strong public face for the publication while likewise pressing it forward. The site was (and in lots of methods still is) honestly left-leaning with a heavy dosage of seaside elites composing for it, however Polgreen has actually stated she wishes to interest a more comprehensive audience yes, even Trump citizens .

The redesign, Polgreen stated, is suggested to hold on to the voice and perceptiveness of HuffPost while taking it forward. The site initially discovered appeal in the period of seo, best understood for pleasing Googlers asking things like “ What time does the Super Bowl begin?

Now, digital media has actually transitioned to social networks, where HuffPost stays a significant gamer especially on Facebook, where it typically tops Newswhip’s regular monthly rankings .

Image: huffpost

Image: HUFFPOST

Along with its brand-new site and name, HuffPost has a brand-new logo design. Farewell H, hey there slash. It’s indicated to represent that HuffPost isn’t really your fundamental news site. The color is likewise going through a minor tweak.

“So what sets us apart? It’s that editorial voice, therefore when we’re aiming to determine the best ways to reveal that in logo design type … we returned to the concept of a slash, it leans forward, actually,” Beizer stated.

WATCH: This individual helicopter is the motorbike of the sky

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontHuffPost shows off its slick new look
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Franklin Foer: ‘Big tech has been rattled. The conversation has changed’

When the author Franklin Foer initially raised issues about Silicon Valleys power gamers, individuals took a look at me amusing. Now his work appears prophetic

The admission by Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg was disconcerting.

“Things occurred on our platform in this election that ought to not have actually occurred,” she stated in an onstage interview recently with Mike Allen, the reporter and Washington diary-keeper. “Especially, and really unpleasant, foreign disturbance in a democratic election.”

But Sandberg averted a string of follow-up concerns. What “things”? When precisely did Facebook see the “things”? Was it a great deal of “things”? Has the business looked after the issue? And why should the general public take Facebook’s word for it?

The Sandberg interview became part of a very first wave of troubleshooting by Facebook in a crisis that is simply starting to substance. Executives from Facebook, Google and Twitter have actually been contacted us to provide sworn public statement prior to a United States congressional panel early next month about exactly what occurred on their platforms in the run-up to the governmental election, now practically a year earlier. The business have actually likewise been approached by Robert Mueller, the unique counsel examining supposed ties in between Russia and the Donald Trump governmental project.

For all the consequences of Trump’s presidency, amongst the most unexpected might be the hostile analysis that has actually emerged of America’s star-dusted tech business, as awareness dawns of how Russia made the most of the business’ platforms– and their extremely successful fascinations with targeting people and content sharing, minus oversight– to raise Trump and attack Hillary Clinton.

“They’re being rattled in such a way where they’ve never ever been rattled,” stated Franklin Foer, whose brand-new book, World Without Mind: the Existential Threat of Big Tech , can be checked out as an exceptional prediction of huge tech’s public numeration. Speaking on the phone from Washington DC, Foer stated it would be an error to believe the federal government was striking the business yet “with its heaviest blows”.

“It’s simply to state that they’ve simply been so unharmed for so long, that even these reasonably harmless calls to turn over proof or to affirm are culturally and politically considerable.”

Foer’s book outgrew a cover story about monopolistic abuses by Amazon in The New Republic, the intellectually recognized, century-old publication of public affairs at which Foer took 2 turns as editor. At the time, Foer was wanting to transform the publication for the Facebook age after it was purchased by a co-founder of Facebook. His individual informing of that story in World Without Mind remembers a previous book where he utilized his nuclear-grade soccer fandom to describe globalization.

“I began dealing with this in 2014, when I did, individuals took a look at me amusing,” Foer stated of the brand-new book. “It resembled I was a hippy wailing into the wind, it seemed like, due to the fact that of the eminence that these tech business held. Unexpectedly, when the book came out last month, I had a radio host implicating me of spouting the traditional knowledge. The tide had actually turned so rapidly.

“The greatest issue is that Facebook and Google are these huge feedback loops that provide individuals exactly what they wish to hear. When you utilize them in a world where your predispositions are being continuously validated, you end up being vulnerable to phony news, propaganda, demagoguery.”

Official and public outrage is growing at the tech business with the awareness that an army of Russia-linked bots and giants running as imposter accounts on Facebook, Twitter and other networks had the ability to purchase advertisements and target an approximated numerous millions of Americans with political messages throughout the election. The strategies of the imposter accounts, which looked for to irritate users over hot-button social concerns, have actually highlighted a sneaking sense of the nation having actually been practically gotten into– and outmaneuvered.

 google /> Photograph: JasonDoiy/Getty Images

The present examination is all the complete stranger considered that huge tech has actually gotten a virtual totally free pass in its present version. For the last 15 years, legislators have actually shrugged as Amazon bulldozed its method to a near- monopoly in the book organisation and most each retail organisation. And nobody took much interest as Facebook controlled users’ news feeds, inflated its metrics to marketers and explore owning citizen turnout. Couple of appeared to care as Google scanned libraries loaded with copyrighted product and, like Apple, moved billions in properties offshore to reduce tax liabilities. These business continued to grow and squeeze almost every rival out.

The bigger concerns of possible risks presented by huge tech, on the other hand– as the business gather unlimited information about United States people to whom they constantly offer gadgets and items developed to make our lives constantly easier– have actually shown entirely outside the federal government’s ken.

Like no other occasion prior to it, Foer stated, the election of Trump has actually taken shape the sensation that the huge tech business– Facebook, Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft — have actually maybe been permitted to collect a little excessive power with somewhat insufficient oversight.

“The election is the important things that’s altered the discussion,” he stated. “For liberals, a great deal of it pertains to this mad sense that Facebook was in some way complicit in the Trump success. For conservatives, it’s their rote hatred of huge media, in the sense that gatekeepers who are liberal will constantly rig the system in favor of liberals. In the end, it’s a shared stress and anxiety.

“There are plainly emancipatory powers prowling within these brand-new innovations. When that power ends up being caught, and when uniqueness and our sense of company ends up being illusory– when power ends up being so deeply focused in a little handful of companies on which we all depend, then we are skewing in the instructions of dystopia.”

When Foer started dealing with his book, he was nearing completion of an extremely individual lesson about how huge tech might cannot measure up to its own high-minded objectives. 2 years previously, the Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes had actually dedicated a sliver of his fortune to purchasing The New Republic and persuaded Foer to take a 2nd turn as editor-in-chief.

Hughes, Foer composes, was “a legendary hero– boyishly innocent, remarkably abundant, intellectually curious, suddenly simple, and happily optimistic”. The publication developed a brand-new website without an identifiable advertisement existence and avoided seo and other uninspiring tools that contemporary media business utilize in the mission for clicks and the advertisement cash behind them.

The experiment ended after Foer released the Amazon cover story and Hughes, having actually recognized just how much cash he was losing, employed a CEO from Yahoo! who rebranded the publication as a “vertically incorporated digital media business”. A personnel exodus took place, with Foer in front.

“I hope this book does not encounter as sustained by anger, however I do not wish to reject my anger either,” Foer composes. In World Without Mind, his review of Amazon has actually progressed into a sophisticated polemic versus the huge business whose capability to please customers has for too long masked corollary threats for the economy, for individual privacy and, eventually, for the workout of democracy.

“It’s not that we have to toss our iPhones into the sea, or that we have to position the concept of an online search engine into an archive where just scholars with white gloves would have the ability to take a look at it,” Foer stated. “We must have the ability to form these innovations in a manner that they do not disrupt the functions of our democracy, they do not addict us, they do not control us.”

Foer welcomes the concern of exactly what type of guideline might remain in order– an old-fashioned monopoly-bust? A federal information security law?– by indicating London’s choice to de-license Uber, and to the effort in Europe to tame Google.

“I’m actually doubtful of the concept that there can be some regulative body that can manage Facebook and require it to act in a virtuous sort of method,” he stated.

“The Europeans are sort of searching towards the dismemberment of Google today, by attempting to sever the advertisement company from its search service. I believe that there’s some comparable sort of design that might be used to Facebook that would have the result of seriously injuring its monopoly and would have the result of making it act more virtuously.”

Foer likewise indicates an effort introduced this summertime by a union of significant paper and brand-new media business to obtain approval from Congress to haggle jointly with Facebook and Google over advertisement income and access to material. Even as they count on the tech giants to discover a broad readership, media business have actually been starved of advertisement income, and pressed in some cases to termination, by the very same business.

“That the media alliance is promoting regulative options is intriguing,” stated Foer. “That it’s not simply silently groaning about Google and Facebook, that they’re now actively pressing back. And I believe it’s shown in the protection.

“It’s relatively spectacular to take a look at the paper every day and to awaken to exactly what appears like a fresh mainstream media attack on huge tech, which is something I actually had not anticipated. New media had actually sort of laid prostrate prior to these men, and generally accepted their fate as type of being connected to Facebook and Google.

“It’s like a post-Soviet state having a color transformation to enjoy media rebel versus these business.”

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/us

Marissa SafontFranklin Foer: ‘Big tech has been rattled. The conversation has changed’
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This startup wants you to be able to publish your blog from any device

Image: verst

If you’re looking to build your brand with some fresh content, your first stop may be WordPress.com or Medium, or you may choose Wix (the favorite of part-Victoria Secret model, part-coder Karlie Kloss).

CEO AJ Frank would rather you pick Verst to post, manage, and monetize your words (from anywhere including your smartphone) and really understand your audience.

Just over a year old, Verst launched several new features Wednesday that include paid subscriptions, homepage designs, a cheaper pricing tier, content migration from WordPress, and email delivery.

Frank previously worked as a senior product manager at Uber, the general manager at Vine, and in new business development at Google. So, he’s quite familiar with getting people online, especially on their smartphones, to click, scroll, and watch.

While competitor sites like WordPress, Medium, Wix, and custom-made websites seem plentiful, Frank said he and his team saw a need for a mobile-focused and data-empowered solution.

“We’re a fully featured publishing platform, for professionals, not just hobbyists. We want you to own your audience the way that you wont on Facebook and use Verst as your central hub,” Frank said.

Image: verst

The latest update lets bloggers put some of their content behind a paywall, offering a way to making money beyond digital advertising also offered on the site. Bloggers take 90 percent of the revenue.

Verst is less of a drag and drop experience like Wix and not just a one-option only version like Medium. Instead, quite like WordPress, users can choose between a handful of design options which can then be easily altered. Unlike WordPress, Verst is well-designed and has a mobile app for publishing.

“Our number one [priority is] making it easier to use and maintain a site,” Frank said. “We have a mobile solution, where we want any publisher to be able to work off their phone or their tablet.”

Frank didn’t disclose how many users they have but pointed to some popular pages. For example, Reid Hoffman, cofounder of LinkedIn, is an advisor to the company and runs his blog with Verst. He shares some blog posts to LinkedIn too. Political pundit and activist Ian Capstick, YouTuber Chris Klemens, and mental health app Stigma also use Verst.

What Verst can’t guarantee, Frank said, is building you an audience.

While Medium has a built-in social network aspect, Verst acts simply as your landing page. It’s up to you to share the page across Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, for example. Verst does help with search engine optimization to improve your Google ranking and also provides other audience insights so you can be smarter about when to post.

Of course, content hosting isn’t free. Verst has been charging $29 per month for the whole experience but is also introducing a $12 per month tier.

Next up for Verst is offering more insights and tips. A mobile notification of the Verst app may suggest when would be a good time to post and maybe one day even post or share automatically.

“We can be not only a place you can publish and view analytics but also a coach for you. The more you publish the easiest it is to build an audience,” Frank said.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/12/verst-blog-wordpress-alternative-audience-data-mobile/

Marissa SafontThis startup wants you to be able to publish your blog from any device
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HuffPost shows off its slick new look

Image: huffpost

When talking about the future of the Huffington Post brand, editor-in-chief Lydia Polgreen points to the homepage “splash” following the news that Bill O’Reilly had been let go from Fox News.

“BILLY ON THE STREET” blared the headline in big, red letters.

Image: mediaite

That’s a sensibility that Polgreen wants to not just keep but expand. On Monday, the Huffington Post is rolling out its biggest redesign ever and first-ever rebrand and its biggest move since the exit of cofounder and namesake Arianna Huffington.

And about that namesake role. The media company will now call itself HuffPost, and it’s got a new logo and website to go along with the new name.

The new website keeps the classic “splash” homepage and three-column setup, but cleans up the top. It looks more like a modern website as opposed to the older design that Polgreen notes was part of the site’s original homage to the newspapers it was designed to imitate.

Image: HuffPost

Not only is the splash still there, get ready to see it elsewhere.

“This is a fun way for us to take what we see as our voice and users see as our voice and take it off platform,” said Julia Beizer, HuffPost‘s head of product.

The redesign comes a little more than eight months since Arianna Huffington left the publication that she started in 2005. Under her leadership, the website grew into a major digital media destination, winning a Pulitzer Prize and eventually selling to AOL for $315 million in 2011.

Huffington’s reign wasn’t without its problems. The website struggled to turn a profit (an issue that continues to dog digital media startups), while the company’s reliance on unpaid bloggers and its internal culture faced plenty of critiques.

Now, HuffPost is in the midst of a transition period. The website, now technically owned by Verizon (after it bought AOL), announced in December the appointment of Polgreen, then a well-respected veteran editor at the New York Times.

Since taking over, Polgreen has emerged as a strong public face for the publication while also pushing it forward. The website was (and in many ways still is) openly left-leaning with a heavy dose of coastal elites writing for it, but Polgreen has said she hopes to appeal to a broader audience yes, even Trump voters.

The redesign, Polgreen said, is meant to hang on to the voice and sensibility of HuffPost while taking it forward. The website first found popularity in the era of search engine optimization, best known for satisfying Googlers asking things like “What time does the Super Bowl start?

Now, digital media has transitioned to social media, where HuffPost remains a major player particularly on Facebook, where it often tops Newswhip’s monthly rankings.

Image: huffpost

Image: HUFFPOST

Along with its new website and name, HuffPost has a new logo. Goodbye H, hello slash. It’s meant to symbolize that HuffPost isn’t your basic news website. The color is also undergoing a slight tweak.

“So what sets us apart? It’s that editorial voice, and so when we’re trying to figure out how to show that in logo form… we came back to the idea of a slash, it leans forward, literally,” Beizer said.

WATCH: This personal helicopter is the motorcycle of the sky

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/25/huffpost-redesign/

Marissa SafontHuffPost shows off its slick new look
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Fashion week job swap: could I become an Instagram star?

Social media stars are wielding increasing power in the fashion industry; what happens when Jess Cartner-Morley trades places with influencer Doina Ciobanu?

The front row is a world divided. Montagues and Capulets, in bare legs rather than doublet and hose. Between the two blocs editors on the one hand, influencers on the other there is little love lost. Last autumn, American Vogue staffers branded the influencers pathetic, describing the job as turning up, looking ridiculous, posing, twitching in your seat as you check your social media feeds. The influencers hit back, branding their Vogue attackers as haughty and out of touch. (Get back to your Werthers Originals, was a particularly choice comeback.) We think they are airheads; they think we are fogeys. So, to find out whos right, I have arranged a job swap at London fashion week. Doina Ciobanu is 22, has 225,000 followers on Instagram (at time of writing), and attends shows as a model, VIP guest and brand ambassador. Ciobanu grew up in the former Soviet republic of Moldova, where she began blogging aged 16. She moved to Bucharest at 19, and now lives in London. For Saturday at London Fashion Week, I will do her job and she will do mine.

My job is to write about the shows. Writing to deadline frames my days and everything else designer interviews, checking out up-and-comers, analysing emerging trends has to fit around that. Doinas job is to provide online content, mostly self-portraits with fairly brief captions, some of which are arranged in collaboration with labels whose clothes or beauty products she wears in the photos. I am an expert; Doina is an avatar.

Julien
Julien Macdonald is interviewed by Doina Ciobanu. Photograph: David Newby for the Guardian

The unspoken fashion editor dress code is low-key. Black trousers and a navy jumper is fine. The goalposts have shifted over the past decade, as fashion week has become a more public event but still. Today, however, I am an influencer. So my first outfit is a new-season Gucci logo T-shirt, Mih wide-legged, floor-sweeping jeans, a checked Simone Rocha jacket with puffy sleeves, to which I have added my own black Nicholas Kirkwood shoes and a cherry-red Alexander McQueen bag that is many years old. The outfit feels cumbersome, both literally (I cant get the belt to sit right, and Im terrified of tripping over the hem of the jeans) and figuratively. It takes up a lot of mental space, being dressed like this.

I meet with Doina in a Pret near London Wall, around the corner from the Julien Macdonald show. She has come dressed as a journalist, in jeans and a black sweater, with her hair in a bun. But she doesnt look like a journalist at all, not just because the sweater is a fancy one that Julien sent over this morning for her to wear to the show, but because she is 22 and, like most of the new wave of influencers, absurdly beautiful. Imagine Kendall Jenner crossed with Emily Ratajkowski, and you get the idea: not just gorgeous, but with a specific aesthetic that is millennial catnip. Eyes disproportionately large, cheekbones defined even in repose, she looks like an animated Snapchat filter.

Doinas favourite book, she tells me, is Platos Republic. She reads newspapers in English the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times but fiction in Russian. (A lot of things in life, you can express them better in Russian.) Her life plan is first to build a brand along the lines of Chiara Ferragni, aka The Blonde Salad, the 29-year-old Italian influencer who has built a personal brand worth an estimated 10m, and then to become the first female president of Moldova. I have plenty of time, she says. I will do this first, and then, when I am 40, perhaps I will go into politics. I am 43. What have I been doing with all my time?

Outside the show, Doina greets the streetstyle photographers with kisses before obligingly recrossing the road so they can get a better shot of her arriving. And then crossing the road again, so they can get the shot again. And again, and again. She does this eight or nine times, allowing each photographer to capture the same reportage-style shot of her, apparently serenely indifferent to the lens. These images will appear on streetstyle blogs; the photographers will tag her, so she can find and regram the images.

Jess
Jess outside a show at London fashion week 2017. Photograph: David Newby for the Guardian

Being Doina is a complex business. Some brands pay her to model in their social media marketing, others pay her to endorse their products. An agent negotiates fees. He looks at what a regular model would get paid, and at what a top celebrity would get paid, and pitches me somewhere in the middle, she explains. A brand will send Doina images or samples of a new seasons products it could be a mascara or a piece of jewellery and if I like the brand and it fits my aesthetic, she will select pieces she is happy to endorse. But many posts are unsponsored, starring Doina in clothes she has bought or borrowed. These reinforce her aesthetic and voice, and build following.

The resistance of the fashion establishment to the likes of Doina is one part anxiety (the elite always fear becoming obsolete), one part snobbery (there have always been It girls who got photographed outside shows, but they used to be debutantes, the goddaughters of the elite, not young women from Moldova), and one part ethical suspicion that there is something compromised or false about the influencer role. This last part is tricky to unpick. Authenticity means something different for Doinas generation than for mine. A tiny example: halfway through our day, a shot appears on Doinas Instagram account of her in a cafe, captioned much-needed coffee between shows; we havent stopped for coffee. But when I bring it up, she is politely nonplussed by how baffled I am. In the run-up to busy periods, she explains, she will often prepare posts so as to have appropriate content ready to go. That the photo wasnt taken on the day doesnt strike her as in any way fake. Her social media isnt a logbook of her life, its a contemporaneous brand-strategy document. So long as shes the one calling the shots, then it is true to herself, because it is true to her vision of herself.

To Doina, being independent of commercial alliance is not aspirational. A generation who have grown up dreaming of becoming personal brands do not treat brands with suspicion. Now that every man and woman is her own brand, The Man is the bogeyman no more. If the designer of a dress she likes will pay Doina to wear that dress, thats not a compromise, its win-win. Indeed, she sees herself as a force for good. I want to get involved in female rights in eastern Europe, because no one is fighting for this, she says. Moldova is one of the poorest countries in Europe, and its female population face significant discrimination. A 2010 study by the National Bureau of Statistics found that 63% of women had experienced psychological, physical or sexual violence from their husband or partner. In her efforts to use her profile to help the cause, Doina has been in touch with UN Women in Moldova, and with Versace, who are very interested in talking about female empowerment, she adds, as if the UN and Versace were two comparable platforms.

Doinas business model is resolutely digital, but her aesthetic is absolutely within the glossy magazine tradition. Her Instagram is all bubble baths in chic hotel rooms, soulful evening strolls along the Seine. My content is always aspirational, she says, and that takes time. I cant take a photo if theres litter on the pavement. So there is, inevitably, a disconnect between the carefree tone of her content and the effort required. The Julien Macdonald show runs half an hour late, so its a race against the clock across to London to a meet-and-greet for influencers with Gigi Hadid at the Tommy Hilfiger store, an appointment that is as significant in Doinas diary as any fashion show. Hadid, with nearly 32m followers on Instagram, is digital fashion royalty.

Doina
Doina greets photographers outside a London fashion week show. Photograph: David Newby for the Guardian

During fashion week, my life involves a lot of small talk with whoever I happen to be seated next to. But in Doinas world, communication through a screen trumps talking to the people who are around you every time. Its a numbers game: if an influencer has to choose between talking to the thousands of people who are with her on social media or the three people in her taxi, she will naturally prioritise the thousands. In the cab on the way to Knightsbridge, she breaks off our conversation to post a video on her Instagram story telling her followers that she is in a cab on the way to Knightsbridge. At the Tommy Hilfiger shop, influencers nod greetings to each other and get on with the business of posting photos to their followers. After the rush to get here, Hadid is running late and I am now regretting having passed up the opportunity to eat at Pret. The room is lavishly catered with beautiful food that does not seem intended for actual consumption. There are miniature burgers, but the beef patties are sandwiched between macaroons rather than bread buns. It looks shareable, but only in the digital sense. When Hadid arrives, she and Doina say hello and then, even before Doina has lifted her phone aloft, they both automatically fluff their hair and position their faces next to each other for a selfie video, which Doina immediately posts on her Instagram with the caption keep running into this beauty.

By now I am starving. But theres no time to stop, because we are racing back along the river for a fly-by visit to the Astley Clarke presentation at the Institution of Engineering next to the Savoy hotel, before a two-mile dash north to Bloomsbury and the JW Anderson show. Doinas sweet face clouds over when she realises she has been neglecting her Snapchat over the last couple of hours. If I forget, she says, my mum or boyfriend will text to nag me about it. She works every day from morning until midnight or 2am. At Christmas, she took three days off from social media. Those were my only days off in the past three years, she says. This is the only time I hear Doina being remotely negative about anything. Being an influencer might be hard work, but to make it lucrative it has to be aspirational, so you have to look like you are having fun at all times.

Doina
Doina and Jess arrive at a show. Photograph: David Newby for the Guardian

One of the key differentiators between editors and influencers is that while we wear the same clothes all day, give or take a 9pm black tie upgrade, influencers will often change into an outfit by the designer of each show they attend. So, on the way to JW Anderson, I commandeer the backseat of a British Fashion Council car to change into a skirt and shirt by the designer. The stress of being in my bra and knickers in broad daylight, fumbling to fasten shirt buttons in time to make the next show, rattles me more than any copy deadline does. I completely forget to put the coordinating earrings on, and give up on changing shoes, because the skirt is much too long and has a tentacle-shaped hemline that I swear is trying to kill me. But it turns out you do have to suffer for fashion. The killer skirt works. The photographers outside the show love it, and my picture ends up on American Vogues Best Street Style Pics from Londons Fall 2017 Shows. Still, you can tell Im not meant to be there: everyone else in the gallery is studiously avoiding eye contact with the photographer for the preferred candid format. I am smiling at the camera. Total sophistication fail.

Doina is much better at my job than I am at hers. After the show, we head to Emilia Wickstead, and soon afterwards she files her reviews to me for feedback. They are excellent. From her Julien Macdonald review: Female empowerment is a term du jour. But where New Yorks designers offered up feminism in the guise of slogan tees, Macdonald interpreted it through his concept of a future where clothes are made on-demand, tailored to the shape of every woman.

We go our separate ways for a short time, and when I see her again at the 9pm Versus show, I am reminded of the famous quote about Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire: that she did everything he did, backwards and in high heels. Doina has used the hour to change out of her jeans and into a fuchsia tuxedo suit with a black lace camisole and spike-heeled sandals. And me? I ate a pizza.

Doinas week as Jess: Im probably having more fun

I work hard at the fashion shows, but Im not going to pretend its not glamorous. You can see that on my Instagram feed, where Im skipping down a crumbling staircase in Paris or posing in a Louis Vuitton minidress in Milan. What you dont see is the behind-the-scenes effort: the months of meetings beforehand, the Google doc full of contact details for designers, so I dont end up wearing the same Gucci loafers as everyone else. You dont see the last-minute panics on show day: changing my outfit in the car while my driver tactfully waits on the pavement; shoving protein bars into my mouth between appointments.

Doina
Doina Ciobanu at a launch party in London. Photograph: David Benett

Ive always been fascinated by the journalists I see at fashion week. I like how serious they look. They are in their own world, while Im talking to my followers on my two phones. Were both working, but I feel like Im probably having more fun. I love print journalism; I love to feel a magazine in my hands; I know some people think its irrelevant these days, but I really hope that is not the case.

The Guardians fashion team asked me to make like a journalist and wear one simple outfit, rather than get changed between the shows. That was a liberation: no desperate rush to find somewhere to change. I even had time to buy a coffee.

At the Julien Macdonald show, it felt very strange to be taking notes, rather than pictures. Its such a tight space on the front row that a notebook and pen were useless. As soon as the clapping had finished, I rushed backstage, as instructed, to grab a quote. Macdonald was friendly, but I was in a crush of other journalists, everyone is muscling in, trying to congratulate him or ask questions. I had to manage all that, and say something intelligent, and take notes, too. Its very different from meeting a designer as an influencer, when Ill kiss them on the cheek and say, I love your clothes, and theyll say, You look beautiful, and thats it.

I wrote the review on my phone, while walking down the street between shows. It was stressful. Im used to writing one thing quickly on Instagram; I dont need to give that a lot of thought. But a lot of people are going to read this, and theres an additional layer of stress that comes from knowing that its the Guardian.

My next assignment, an Emilia Wickstead report, was harder. We were short of time, so I didnt go backstage to speak to her and had to come up with an analysis on my own. It was the end of the day, I was hungry, I was tired, my brain wasnt working. I started writing the piece on the way home; the deadline seemed impossibly soon and I was anxious to make it good.

I studied political science and history, so I love understanding the cause of events. Being a journalist for a day gave me a chance to flex those analytic muscles; as an influencer, you simply look at what looks good on people, what you think people would like. Id love to use my brain more in that way in the future, by getting more involved in activism, using my following for good. But I wouldnt be a journalist. Im an independent soul. Usually, when Im working, Im the brand. As a journalist, its not about you.

Doinas Julien Macdonald review

All hail female empowerment. Or so indicated designer Julien Macdonald backstage after successfully debuting his autumn/winter 2017 collection.

Female empowerment, feminism and their ilk are the terms du jour for the fashion set right now. New York fashion week gave collection after collection where womens rights were the focus. But where New Yorks designers offered up feminism in the guise of slogan tees and underwear surely destined for fame as a hashtag, Macdonald interpreted it through his concept of a future where technology has such an impact on fashion that clothes are made on demand, tailored to the shape of every individual woman.

For Macdonald that is, of course, a particular style of clothing and a particular type of woman. One empowered, one confident. If feminism is a thread that runs through Macdonalds winter 2017 collection, its the same feminism that the likes of Emily Ratajkowski can be found celebrating: that a woman can express herself and her person at a time of her choosing, Laura Mulveys male gaze be damned. Appropriate, then, that Ratajkowski has done much justice to Macdonalds designs before now.

Macdonald does a style and he does it well. His hallmark spiderweb dresses are still to be found, but increasingly with straighter lines and alongside dresses offering a sleeker and more futuristic vision. Macdonald told me that his inspiration was modern architecture, big cities [and] the metropolis. His autumn/winter 2017 may be inspired by a future landscape, but theres also an air of the imagined future that the likes of Fritz Lang once saw for us. Nostalgia, the present, and the future always go hand in hand.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2017/apr/07/fashion-week-job-swap-jess-cartner-morley-doina-ciobanu-instagram

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