All posts tagged: marketing

10 marketing books you should read in 2017

Image: Shutterstock/ Rawpixel.com

Interview after interview with leading entertainers has the tendency to expose comparable everyday practices: an early wake time; a routine workout routine; and a designated time for reading.

Reading a lot wont always make you an excellent leader, however it appears excellent leaders have the tendency to check out a lot with uncommon exceptions. Since its the most effective method to get the condensed details, assistance, and insights they require to stand out at their tasks, terrific leaders check out. Who wishes to transform the wheel when others have offered the plan? This is specifically important in the marketing world, where the obstacles dealing with primary marketing officers and other online marketers are altering daily.

If youre all set to take your marketing video game to the next level, heres a rundown of 10 of the very best brand-new marketing books to dive into this year:

1. “They Ask You Answer” by Marcus Sheridan

Marcus Sheridan is a legend in the digital marketing world after he utilized content marketing to raise his stopping working swimming pool business from the verge of insolvency to end up being among the biggest in the nation. Sheridans method is based upon 2 essential presumptions: your consumers are wise readers who desire you to inform them and your finest resource for doing so (the web) is totally free.

“They Ask You Answer” reveals you the best ways to end up being the authority theyre trying to find and get their trust, you have to concentrate about who your consumers are and exactly what they desire. Exactly what are they puzzled about? Afraid of? Yearning for? Exactly what are their discomfort points and their dream situations?

Answer those concerns with your material, and youll have an entire brand-new cadre of brand name ambassadors to do your marketing for you.

2. “Non-Obvious 2017” by Rohit Bhargava

Georgetown Professor and creator of the Influential Marketing Group, Rohit Bhargava is a self-professed non-obvious pattern manager. His series has actually been tracking patterns because 2011 in the locations of culture and customer habits, marketing and social networks, media and education, style and innovation, and economics and entrepreneurshipall which digital online marketers ought to be following.

“Non-Obvious 2017” recognizes 5 brand name brand-new trendsincluding intense womanhood, passive commitment, and moonshot entrepreneurship, and examines over 60 patterns from earlier editions, offering durability forecasts for each. Bhargava likewise teaches his readers the abilities needed to do exactly what he doescut through the sound and recognize the emerging patterns and patterns others miss out on. If you desire your marketing to resonate (and who doesnt?), #peeee

, this is the book for you.

3. “SEO for Growth” by John Jantsch and Phil Singleton

Since Google is an essential source of web traffic and list building, business cant assistance however concern how strong their online search engine presence truly is. If you do not guide the fundamentals by now, or have not stayed up to date with the numerous Google algorithm modifications impacting your site, its time to obtain captured up.

John Jantsch and Phil Singleton put their years of experience and research study to work for you, revealing you the best ways to take advantage of the brand-new guidelines of seo to optimize your sites natural ranking capacity.

From top-level method to methods you can right away execute, “SEO for Growth” is a must-read for business owners and online marketers.

4. “Hug Your Haters” by Jay Baer

For Jay Baer, a grumbling consumer is not a business issue, its among their finest properties.

Most disappointed consumers wont ever inform you where you failed, leaving you thinking ways to do much better. A grumbling client in fact provides you a significant chance for development and restorative action. Far a lot of company care insufficient about retention, putting much focus on outgoing marketing and the destination of brand-new clients, with relatively little attention paid to the clients theyve currently paid to obtain, composes Baer.

“Hug Your Haters” describes the 2 kinds of haters any company is most likely to come across, recognizes exactly what they desire and informs you ways to provide it to them. And its loaded with concreteand hilariouscase research studies so you can see their reactions in action.

Follow their lead and youll be turning haters into brand name supporters prior to your really eyes.

5. “Pre-Suasion” by Robert Cialdini Ph.D.

To genuinely convince somebody, inning accordance with Robert Cialdini, you have to do more than alter their mind; you have to alter their mindset. In “Pre-Suasion”, the long-awaited follow up to his New York Times bestseller, “Influence,” Cialdini directs our focus on the time instantly preceding the message, or exactly what he calls the fortunate minute for modification. When you can prime your target to be more responsive to your words, it is at this vital point. Get them in the ideal frame of mind, he argues, and they will be a lot more most likely to concur with you. The book details ideas and method that you can utilize in a range of contexts to encourage individuals of your message, even prior to you state a word.

6. “Get Scrappy” by Nick Westergaard

Afraid you cant complete due to the fact that youre a mother and pop store in a huge block shop environment? Youll take solace fromand discover a beneficial roadmap inNick Westergaards “Get Scrappy”. Host of the popular On Brand podcast, Westergaards easy message is precisely what you wish to hear: you can punch above your weight. More than simply a collection of ideas, he supplies a whole system for scrappy marketing, beginning with the actions you cant miss out on, ways to do more with less, and concluding with streamlining your approaches for the long run. Its an useful overview of assisting you attain huge outcomes on a little spending plan.

7. “What Customers Crave” by Nicholas Webb

Nicholas Webb desires you to reconsider customer support and your targeting systems. Forget age, geographical place, or race, Webb argues. Its a lot more essential to understand exactly what your clients enjoy and exactly what they dislike. If you understand their likes and dislikes, what consumers really long for are incredible experiences and you can just offer them that. For Webb, customer care is not a technical procedure; its a style procedure, and it requires development. He strolls you through the best ways to determine various consumer types, so you can determine ways to produce remarkable experiences throughout all the various consumer touch points. “What Customers Crave” will alter the method you consider client service and ways to increase those conversion rates.

8. “Invisible Influence” by Jonah Berger

People presume they have much higher control over their choice making than they really do. As Wharton School Marketing Professor Jonah Berger shows in “Invisible Influence”, the truth is that we are all subject to the power of social impact. Berger reveals the forces that discreetly form our habits and demonstrates how, contrary to typical belief, this is typically a favorable thing. As an example, Berger websites the social assistance phenomenon, where doing an activity with another person (state running) assists us do it much better (faster). And for those cases where social impact is a barrier to great choice making, such as when it comes to group believe, Berger offers useful pointers for conquering it. We might all go through unnoticeable impacts on our habits, however feeling in one’s bones exactly what those are can put a few of the power back in our hands.

9. “Hacking Marketing” by Scott Brinker

According to Scott Brinker, marketing systems are dragging the quickly altering environment where theyre running. He determines 5 digital characteristics (speed, flexibility, accuracy, scale, and adjacency) that have actually changed the work of marketing, and proposes a reasonably easy method of bringing order to the turmoil. As marketing ends up being more digital and online marketers are significantly dependent on software application to do their tasks, the art of handling marketing progressively looks like the art of handling software application. Marketing supervisors ought to embrace the effective structures and procedures software application supervisors have actually currently established. “Hacking Marketing” supplies a hands-on (and non-technical) guide to producing your own nimble marketing procedures and serves as a much-needed tip that when our environment and tools have actually altered, our work procedures must.

10. “Digital Sense” by Travis Wright and Chris Snook

Travis Wright and Chris Snook acknowledge that marketing today is everything about customer care. And like Jay Baer, they see it as an age of chance. They have actually designed an entire brand-new marketing system based upon 2 frameworksThe Experience Marketing Framework and the Social Business Strategy Frameworkto assist you comprehend and exceed clients expectations at every phase of the purchasers journey and get all your staff members on board. Their discover, prepare, do technique permits you to reach consumers while likewise enabling find, style, release development to enhance daily operations. “Digital Sense” has plenty of information, workouts, and specialized understanding to assist you comprehend their method and personalize it to match your requirements.

These must-reads are fresh handles our quickly progressing field, chock loaded with directing structures, valuable methods, and actionable pointers. Its a reasonable quantity of research, however it does assure a significant return on the financial investment.

Josh Steimle is the author of Chief Marketing Officers at Work and the CEO of MWI , a digital marketing firm with workplaces in the United States and Asia, and regardless of being over 40 can still do a kickflip on a skateboard.

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa Safont10 marketing books you should read in 2017
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Marketing startup Synup gets $6M Series A to help brands manage their online reputation

Synup founder Ashwin Ramesh

Synup, a startup that helps marketers monitor where their brands are mentioned online, announced that it has raised $6 million in Series A funding led by Vertex Ventures. Existing investor Prime Venture Partners also returned for the round.

Though based in Bangalore, Synup’s main market has been the United States and Canada since it launched two years ago. It will use some of its new capital to expand into the United Kingdom and Europe by the middle of next year.

Founded and CEO Ashwin Ramesh says the U.S. was not only the largest potential market for Synup’s services, but also “the best geography for us to build and perfect our template before going global.”

Synup’s customers use its cloud-based software to track all the places online—including review sites, business directories, search engine results and social networks—where their businesses or products are cited. It makes sure address information is synced, analyzes traffic and conversion rates, monitors the content of customer reviews and makes suggestions for search engine optimization.

Synup claims it hit an average rate of return of $1 million just nine months after it was founded, but it also faces competition from established rivals like Yext and Moz that also help brands track and manage their online mentions. Ramesh says that he believes Synup’s roster of features, which include optional manual listing services provided by the company, reputation monitoring tools for specific industries and insights for Google My Business, Bing and Facebook, is the most comprehensive so far. Synup also provides a white-label program and training for marketing agencies.

In addition to expanding into new markets, Synup also plans to use its new funding to launch new features, including more detailed analytics and new tools for its white-label program.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/25/synup-series-a/

Marissa SafontMarketing startup Synup gets $6M Series A to help brands manage their online reputation
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Conductors new mobile app helps businesses understand what customers are searching for

Conductor is launching a new mobile app that co-founder and CEO Seth Besmertnik described as a way to get quick access to the voice of the customer.

The New York-based company started with a focus on search engine optimization before broadening to offer a broader range of marketing tools. Now, Besmertnik said,The core of what we do is understand your customers and understand what people want. If you know what people want, you can use that to create better content, better marketing, better messaging.

On mobile, that means taking existing Conductor data andmaking it easy to search and understand. Using the app, you can look up any term that you might want to use as the basis for your marketing for example, Besmertnik demonstrated the app by searching for online therapy, bringing up a list of related terms that customers are searching for.

There are also filters around different stages of the customer journey (so you can see what people are lookingfor right before they make a purchase decision), and a feed of insights that help a company understand its data.

Besmertnik is hoping that it wont just be marketers who use the Conductor app. Instead, he said, Every single person in the company, before you change any content, you just check the voice of your customer in two minutes.

And small changes can make a big difference. Conductor says that by using its tools, the AAA found that customers were searching for discounts instead of savings, so it replaced the word savings throughout its website and saw a 30 percent increase in traffic.

The new app is available to all Conductor customers.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/03/conductor-mobile-app/

Marissa SafontConductors new mobile app helps businesses understand what customers are searching for
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RankScience wants to replace your SEO staff

The darkart of search engine optimization could be next in line for software-powered automation potentially putting hundreds of thousands of SEO consultants out of a job.

At least thats the scenario sketched by RankScience, a YC-backed startup just graduating fromacceleratorswinter 2017 program, whose software-as-a-serviceautomates the process of running thousands of A/B tests in order toidentify which changes will improve the Google ranking of customer webpages in organic search results.

Ultimately thats who we do see ourselves replacing, says founder Ryan Bednar of the humble human SEO consultant who spends their days eyeballing scores of dashboards to try to identify beneficial tweaks. But whose days of gainful employment could be numbered ifmanual analyticscan be overtaken by automation.

It is an industry that I think we can disrupt, he continues. Humans are tweaking and measuring and changing, and software is really where things are going and we think this is the start of that.

So the pitch is:goodbye SEO dashboards and specialized in-house staff; and hello subscriptionsoftware forautomated testing andcontinuously optimized web pages. RankScienceclaims anaverage boost to organic search traffic of 37 per cent within three months, arguing such gains area substantial step up from the competition albeit it only hasa couple of dozen customers at this point.

While Bednar says the SEO automation testing approach works well for all sorts of different sites, he flags particular benefits for ecommerce sites, marketplaces, directories, Q&A pages anything where companies have lots of pages.

Our software identifies areas of opportunity and things that companies should be testing based on where theyre ranking now, what theyre competitors are doing, and what opportunities we see. And also this data that we have from across our network things that we see that are working elsewhere on similar sites.

The SaaS platform soft-launched in May last year, and the team has not yet done any active marketing.Most of thecustomers thus far are US-based but it does have some as far afield as Taiwan.

RankSciences methodrequires customers to route their web traffic throughitsCDN in order thatit can run thousands of concurrent split tests on their behalf, although it describes theset up for this asvery easy; two minutes and a simple one-line code change, is the claim.

It also claimsitsdoing things differently vs most of the startup competition in the SEO space because its not just doing analytics; its also automating making the changes too taking a further piece of search optimizationhassle out of its customers hands (assuming, of course, theyre comfortable relinquishing a little control over how their online content is structured, though it sends weekly reports about changes to keepcustomers in the loop).

The most similarcompetitor Bednar can be coaxed toname is BloomReach, which does ecommerce SEO for Fortune 500 companies, but he adds: As far as I know, our continuous, automated split testing software is something theyre not doing. They dont have a CDN, they do hosting for companies, so I think what were doing is differentiated from what theyre doing.

Bednar says the idea for automating search engineoptimizationcamefrom his previous life as an SEO consultant. I realized my main advantage, related to other consultants, was that I was a programmer, and so companies could add me to GitHub, and instead of just sending them PDFs with recommended changes I could actually execute the changes myself Our CDN is an attempt to productize that, he tells TechCrunch.

Almost all of the other SEO software products are analytics tools. They give you insights into how youre doing with rankings, or they maybe make recommendations around things that you should change, he adds.

Our product is the only piece of SEO software that actually does work for you. So instead of creating tasks for engineers or product managers, our software actually handles the work for you, and executes for you. Because were a CDN we can actually make changes to your pages. And other products cant.

RankScience not only carries outA/B tests for its customers, it also identifies which SEO experiments to run although at this point its not yet fully automated that part of its process. So it remains to be seen how they can scale that, and what impact fewerhuman inputs, as Bednar puts it, willhave on the results it can deliver for customers.

For customers its 100 per cent completely automated. On our end its mostly software with some human inputs, he says of the product at this point.When a company comes on board we do interview them to learn about things they care about etc, so there are some human inputs as well. But the rest is software.

We identify what to change and the larger our network gets the more powerful the data we have becomes because we know whats working on other sites across our network and so we have a good idea of what SEO experiments companies should be running.

Bednar emphasizes its SEOmethods are bona fide White Hat. So there are no dubious techniques being deployed in a bidto boost search visibility; its entirelycompliant with Googles best practices, he says, describing himself astotally confident the approach wont get a customers websitepenalized by Google for trying to game itsalgorithm.

As a consequence oflooping traffic through RankSciences CDN there is a very small amount oflatency involved in the process typically around 16m/s of latency or less minimal on accountof how many websites are now hosted on Amazon Web Services cloud service platform, according to Bednar.

The reason its so fast is that most companies now are on AWS and we spin up our CDNs in the same region as companies origin web servers on AWS. Thats one of the reasons that this couldve never been built before. Now everyones basically in the same data center AWS enables this speed.

And if customersare using other cloud service platforms say Google Cloud or Microsoft Azure hesays RankScience can just spin up our CDNs in the same region, so the latency will neverexceed 16m/s regardless of the platform a customer is using.

The team of five has raised a small pre-seed round from friends and the founders own money. Their next step on graduating from YC will be raising a seed.

Were totally focused on scaling right now. Weve spent this last year focusing on product, and validating a lot of our hypothesis. The past six months weve just been trying to add more customers, learn more about how this works for different sites and how people are using this. So were just totally focusing on scaling at this point, and improving the product, he adds.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/07/rankscience-wants-to-replace-your-seo-staff/

Marissa SafontRankScience wants to replace your SEO staff
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10 marketing books you should read in 2017

Image: Shutterstock / Rawpixel.com

Interview after interview with top performers tends to reveal similar daily habits: an early wake time; a regular exercise regimen; and a designated time for reading.

Reading a lot wont necessarily make you a great leader, but it seems great leaders tend to read a lot with rare exceptions. Great leaders read because its the most efficient way to gain the condensed information, guidance, and insights they need to excel at their jobs. Who wants to reinvent the wheel when others have provided the blueprint? This is especially valuable in the marketing world, where the challenges facing chief marketing officers and other marketers are changing daily.

If youre ready to take your marketing game to the next level, heres a rundown of 10 of the best new marketing books to dive into this year:

1. “They Ask You Answer” by Marcus Sheridan

Marcus Sheridan is a legend in the digital marketing world after he used content marketing to lift his failing pool company from the brink of bankruptcy to become one of the largest in the country. Sheridans strategy is based on two fundamental assumptions: your customers are smart readers who want you to educate them and your best resource for doing so (the internet) is free.

“They Ask You Answer” shows you how to become the authority theyre looking for and gain their trust, you need to think hard about who your customers are and what they want. What are they confused about? Afraid of? Longing for? What are their pain points and their dream scenarios?

Answer those questions with your content, and youll have a whole new cadre of brand ambassadors to do your advertising for you.

2. “Non-Obvious 2017” by Rohit Bhargava

Georgetown Professor and founder of the Influential Marketing Group, Rohit Bhargava is a self-professed non-obvious trend curator. His series has been tracking trends since 2011 in the areas of culture and consumer behavior, marketing and social media, media and education, technology and design, and economics and entrepreneurshipall of which digital marketers should be following.

“Non-Obvious 2017” identifies five brand new trendsincluding fierce femininity, passive loyalty, and moonshot entrepreneurship, and reviews over 60 trends from earlier editions, providing longevity predictions for each. Bhargava also teaches his readers the skills necessary to do what he doescut through the noise and identify the emerging trends and patterns others miss.

If you want your marketing to resonate (and who doesnt?), this is the book for you.

3. “SEO for Growth” by John Jantsch and Phil Singleton

Since Google is a crucial source of web traffic and lead generation, companies cant help but question how strong their search engine visibility really is. If you dont have a handle on the basics by now, or havent kept up with the many Google algorithm changes affecting your website, its time to get caught up.

John Jantsch and Phil Singleton put their years of experience and research to work for you, showing you how to leverage the new rules of search engine optimization to maximize your websites organic ranking potential.

From high-level strategy to tactics you can immediately implement, “SEO for Growth” is a must-read for marketers and entrepreneurs.

4. “Hug Your Haters” by Jay Baer

For Jay Baer, a complaining customer is not a companys problem, its one of their best assets.

Most unsatisfied customers wont ever tell you where you went wrong, leaving you guessing how to do better. But a complaining customer actually gives you a major opportunity for growth and corrective action. Far too many business care too little about retention, placing much emphasis on outbound marketing and the attraction of new customers, with comparatively little attention paid to the customers theyve already paid to get, writes Baer.

“Hug Your Haters” outlines the two types of haters any business is likely to come across, identifies what they want and tells you how to give it to them. And its full of concreteand hilariouscase studies so you can see their responses in action.

Follow their lead and youll be turning haters into brand advocates before your very eyes.

5. “Pre-Suasion” by Robert Cialdini Ph.D.

To truly persuade someone, according to Robert Cialdini, you need to do more than change their mind; you need to change their state of mind. In “Pre-Suasion”, the long-awaited sequel to his New York Times bestseller, “Influence,” Cialdini directs our attention to the time immediately preceding the message, or what he calls the privileged moment for change. It is at this crucial juncture when you can prime your target to be more receptive to your words. Get them in the right mindset, he argues, and they will be much more likely to agree with you. The book outlines tips and technique that you can use in a variety of contexts to convince people of your message, even before you say a word.

6. “Get Scrappy” by Nick Westergaard

Afraid you cant compete because youre a mom and pop shop in a big block store environment? Then youll take solace fromand find a useful roadmap inNick Westergaards “Get Scrappy”. Host of the popular On Brand podcast, Westergaards simple message is exactly what you want to hear: you can punch above your weight. More than just a collection of tips, he provides an entire system for scrappy marketing, starting with the steps you cant miss, how to do more with less, and concluding with simplifying your methods for the long haul. Its a practical guide to helping you achieve big results on a small budget.

7. “What Customers Crave” by Nicholas Webb

Nicholas Webb wants you to rethink customer service and your targeting mechanisms. Forget age, geographic location, or race, Webb argues. Its much more important to know what your customers love and what they hate. What customers truly crave are amazing experiences and you can only give them that if you know their likes and dislikes. For Webb, customer service is not a technical process; its a design process, and it demands innovation. He walks you through how to identify different customer types, so you can figure out how to create superior experiences across all of the different customer touch points. “What Customers Crave” will change the way you think about customer service and how to boost those conversion rates.

8. “Invisible Influence” by Jonah Berger

People assume they have much greater control over their decision making than they actually do. But as Wharton School Marketing Professor Jonah Berger demonstrates in “Invisible Influence”, the reality is that we are all subject to the power of social influence. Berger uncovers the forces that subtly shape our behavior and shows how, contrary to common belief, this is often a positive thing. As an example, Berger sites the social facilitation phenomenon, in which doing an activity with someone else (say running) helps us do it better (faster). And for those cases in which social influence is a hindrance to good decision making, such as in the case of group think, Berger provides practical tips for overcoming it. We may all be subject to invisible influences on our behavior, but just knowing what those are can put some of the power back in our hands.

9. “Hacking Marketing” by Scott Brinker

According to Scott Brinker, marketing systems are lagging behind the rapidly changing environment in which theyre operating. He identifies five digital dynamics (speed, adaptability, adjacency, scale, and precision) that have transformed the work of marketing, and proposes a relatively simple way of bringing order to the chaos. As marketing becomes more digital and marketers are increasingly reliant on software to do their jobs, the art of managing marketing increasingly resembles the art of managing software. Therefore, marketing managers should adopt the successful frameworks and processes software managers have already developed. “Hacking Marketing” provides a hands-on (and non-technical) guide to creating your own agile marketing processes and serves as a much-needed reminder that when our environment and tools have changed, our work processes should as well.

10. “Digital Sense” by Travis Wright and Chris Snook

Travis Wright and Chris Snook recognize that marketing today is all about customer service. And like Jay Baer, they see it as an age of opportunity. They have devised a whole new marketing system based on two frameworksThe Experience Marketing Framework and the Social Business Strategy Frameworkto help you understand and surpass customers expectations at every stage of the buyers journey and get all of your employees on board. Their learn, plan, do approach allows you to reach customers while also allowing for discover, design, deploy innovation to improve everyday operations. “Digital Sense” is full of data, exercises, and specialized knowledge to help you understand their approach and customize it to suit your needs.

These must-reads are fresh takes on our rapidly evolving field, chock full of guiding frameworks, helpful tactics, and actionable tips. Its a fair amount of homework, but it does promise a major return on the investment.

Josh Steimle is the author of Chief Marketing Officers at Work and the CEO of MWI, a digital marketing agency with offices in the US and Asia, and despite being over 40 can still do a kickflip on a skateboard.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/02/23/10-marketing-books-to-read-2017/

Marissa Safont10 marketing books you should read in 2017
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How to stalk your competitors’ negative reviews for new customers

Image: Shutterstock / Phoenixns

Stalking your competitors’ reviews can be an extremely effective technique for getting new customers. That said, it’s a strategy that’s more art than science, and must be done very carefully.Responding directly to negative feedback left for your competitors is generally a very bad idea. It can make you look like a jerk, and will more than likely make your competitors pretty unhappy. So, how can you leverage your competitors’ negative reviews to generate leads?This post will come at the issue from two different angles:

  1. How to find your competitors’ negative online reviews, and

  2. How to act on those reviews in a way that doesn’t damage your reputation.


6 ways to find your competitors’ negative reviews

Following are some of the most effective ways to stay on top of negative comments and reviews left for your competitors.

1. Monitor your competitors’ blog comments

Scouring through blog comments will often yield a number of negative comments or unanswered questions from customers. It will also give you some insight into how your competitors typically respond or react to negative feedback.Don’t respond directly to negative comments left on your competitors’ blog! I’ll cover some much more effective ways to utilize these comments at the end of this post.

2. Use Google Alerts to stay on top of brand mentions

Google Alerts remains the industry standard tool for monitoring online mentions. Set up alerts for mentions of your competitors’ brand name, product names and the owner’s full name.This will immediately alert you to mentions – both good and bad – across the web. This will include blogs, news articles, and other web pages.

While you can try setting up alerts for keywords that might indicate negative reviews (e.g., unhappy, complaint, negative), more than likely you’ll have to manually search for all the comments and mentions.

3. Use social listening tools to monitor negative mentions on social media

One of the best ways to stay on top of negative mentions of your competitors is to use a social listening tool like Brand24 or Hootsuite.More than ever before, consumers expect brands to respond to questions and feedback on social media. Brands that do respond appropriately can see some huge benefits. According to some research, customers who were contacted after leaving a negative review were 33% more likely to turn around and leave a positive review, and 18% were more likely to become a loyal customer.If your competitors aren’t responding – or aren’t responding well – to customer complaints, they’re sacrificing these benefits. And you can use this to your advantage.

4. Monitor local review sites using ReviewFlow

According to BrightLocal, when consumers are looking for reviews of a business they typically go to one of two places: either to a search engine or directly to the review site.If your competitors aren’t responding to negative feedback left on review hubs like Yelp, Google My Business and Angie’s List, they’re losing the opportunity to manage their reputation where it counts most.

Using a tool like ReviewFlow, you can actively monitor all the big review sites for mentions of your competitors’ names. While you won’t directly respond to those reviews, you will use what you’ve learned in some other strategic ways (more on this below).

5. Follow your competitors on social media

While a tool like Hootsuite will alert you to many mentions of your competitors on social media, it won’t show comments that don’t explicitly use your competitors’ name. This is where following your competitors and actively monitoring their social media activity is so important.This is particularly important on Facebook, where Visitors Posts won’t show up on social listening tools unless visitors actually mention or tag the business name.

6. Regularly monitor their Amazon reviews

If your competitors use Amazon to sell their products, this can be a great place to watch for negative reviews. While you won’t be able to respond to comments left on your competitors’ product pages, you can use what you’ve learned to improve your own products and customer service.

Note: While it may be possible to track down a reviewer’s email address through their Amazon profile, emailing a user for something other than servicing their order can get your account shut down.

How to use negative reviews to get new customers

I’ve already hinted at some of the ways you can use what you’ve found, however, I’ll cover each of these strategies in more detail below.

Respond directly to dissatisfied customers

As already mentioned, this is something you should do with extreme caution. Responding to questions and negative comments on your competitors’ social media feed or website is generally a pretty terrible idea, so should be reserved for one specific circumstance: if your competitor has abandoned (or virtually abandoned) their website or social media account. Even in this situation, avoid criticizing your competitor, and move the conversation offline asap.

Improve your own products and customer service

Monitoring your competitors’ negative reviews can help you avoid facing the same fate. Use what you’ve learned to improve your products, services, and social customer service skills.Here are a few ways to fix bad reviews.

Reach out to reviewers outside of your competitors’ website or social media feed

If you’ve seen a negative review on a competitor’s website or social media account, go ahead and reach out to the reviewer outside of that channel. Here’s how to connect with them.If you’ve found a blog comment: Click on the commenter’s name. This will often lead you directly to their blog or social media profile. Engage with them on their blog or follow and connect with them via their social media accounts.If you’ve found a comment on your competitors’ social media feed: Follow them on social media and reach out to them with helpful advice of information (e.g., “We heard you’ve been looking for a reliable web designer. We’d like to offer you this coupon for 20% off!”.)

Build up your presence on social media sites where your competitors are failing

This is another indirect way you can reach new customers by succeeding where your competitors are failing. If you notice a competitor regularly receiving negative feedback on Facebook, for instance, boost your efforts on that platform. All those dissatisfied customers are sure to be looking for alternatives…and why shouldn’t it be you?

A final thought

Regardless of how or where you engage with your competitors’ unhappy customers, always try to avoid criticizing the competition. Instead, focus on being empathic (“I’m sorry you had such a bad experience”), and on providing useful information or advice.Looking for more advice on stalking the competition? You may enjoy my post How To Use Social Media To Ethically ‘Stalk’ Competitors And Job Candidates.

John Rampton is serial entrepreneur who now focuses on helping people to build amazing products and services that scale. He is founder of the online payments company Due. He was recently named #2 on Top 50 Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine. Time Magazine recognized John as a motivational speaker that helps people find a “Sense of Meaning” in their lives. He currently advises several companies in the bay area.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/03/07/how-to-stalk-negative-reviews-for-new-customers/

Marissa SafontHow to stalk your competitors’ negative reviews for new customers
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